A little mental help: Action cards

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Depression.

I know many who have and continue to experience it on a day to day basis. Given my training and work on mental health initiatives, I’ve had people approach me to ask about recommended resources on depression (websites, trusted literature, etc.) and tools that inspire motivation and action. And generally speaking, there are some great, evidence-based self-help resources out there:

While there isn’t a shortage of accessible and reliable content, it seems that the bulk of existing resources tend to be extremely text-heavy, look and feel somewhat dated, and come across as a bit dry, drab and ‘clinical’ in nature (e.g., included images are limited to charts and surveys or photo stock images like this). This is not to criticize any particular resource, including the ones I’ve mentioned. Rather, it’s more of a commentary on what I’ve seen and would expect to receive from my own health care practitioner.

To me, managing depression is about bettering one’s own mental health with the support of trusted friends/family and professionals. At the same time, I believe that this process shouldn’t have to feel like undergoing an academic or clinical exercise. It can be daunting enough to acknowledge the need for change, to seek out supports and embark on a treatment plan. Doing so within a clinical context while supporting yourself with dense and somewhat sterile resources probably doesn’t help minimize the overwhelming and uncomfortable feelings that can arise. Perhaps this is a common experience among those who go through the medical system to ‘fix a health problem’, but I think that addressing a mental health issue also comes with unique layers of stigma, challenge and complexity.

I have found few tools that are visual, colorful or feel friendly and personalized to my interests. While it’s actually quite exciting to see soft/hardware being developed that can help track mood and behaviour and enable us to interact with mental health issues in new ways, I think that the existing ‘old-school’ resources out there deserve a re-vamp too — in reality, these are the resources that the majority of care professionals continue to use and recommend in practice.

I decided to make some ‘action cards’ that suggest tangible steps one can take to help overcome depressive feelings. These cards are informed by cognitive behavioural therapy approaches to treatment and aim to be quick, ‘on-the-go’ actions that someone can print out, shuffle through, and carry around. They were also designed for someone familiar with CBT concepts and would probably play a more supportive role to someone undergoing treatment. These were created with a personal intent but are shared here if they (or the idea of them) can be helpful to someone else. Inspired by my own deep dive into the world of animation and cartooning, I decided to create a character who would accompany the cards and (hopefully) can appeal to a general audience. My hope was to create something more playful, personable, less ‘institutional’ feeling, and appealing to adults.

At the top, you can see ‘side 1’ of the cards with the “problem” being faced. ‘Side 2’ below offers a practical action response. I welcome your feedback and ideas on how to improve these cards.

 

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Health Promotion in Canada, A History

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Earlier this year, I decided to create a graphic in order to map out the history of Health Promotion in Canada — key milestones and movements from the 1970s onward. In many ways, this is a response to the lack of visuals and timelines I’ve found documenting health promotion activities. For a country that is internationally recognized for its leadership in this space, it surprises me that I haven’t found too many sharable graphics on this.

Here’s the full PDF draft: HP History_DRAFT3_AYIP

The timeline is unfinished and still in progress. Nonetheless, it serves as a starting point for documenting key moments for the health promotion movement in Canada. I realize that not everyone will agree with the relative importance of events in the timeline and that there are certain pieces that are missing (and only goes up to 2010), but I welcome your feedback. Please comment below with suggestions on what needs to change, stay or be added.

Below, you can find some of the references I used to populate the timeline. Many thanks to Dr. Suzanne Jackson for sharing her health promotion resources with me so this document could be created!

References

Health promotion in Canada: 1986 to 2006 by Suzanne F Jackson and Barbara L Riley

Health promotion in Canada – a case study by Health Canada

The Final 3: EMR, Ageing & Community Building

Electronic medical records:

Ageing/Chronic condition:

Community Building:

 

So I’ve learned that I can get the icons done, but the posting has been slightly delayed. Anyways, I hope you enjoy the final 3 icons. Feedback and thoughts always welcome. This has been a fun exercise and I hope to do it again in the near future 🙂 Just need to be a bit better about my posting schedule!